Posts Tagged ‘Sodium’

Less salt in our food supply could save at least half a million Americans from dying prematurely over the next ten years, according to separate studies conducted at three universities, two American and one Canadian. If the average daily salt intake were to drop to 1,500 milligrams, as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the number of lives saved could more than double. All study results were published in the medical journal Hypertension, a publication of the American Heart Association (AHA).

Americans currently consume on average 3,600 milligrams of salt daily, mostly in form of sodium, widely used as an ingredient in processed foods. Sodium is considered a significant contributor to high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease, heart attack and stroke, all leading causes of death in the U.S. today.

About a third of American adults, or 68 million, suffer from high blood pressure, a.k.a. hypertension, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The condition was identified as a primary or contributing cause of nearly 350,000 deaths in the U.S. in 2008, the last time the CDC has updated its research on the subject.

Despite of these alarming statistics, there are currently no signs of improvement. Even better treatment has only shown mixed results. Less than half (46 percent) of high blood pressure patients have their condition under control, according to the CDC.

Because the salt content in processed food is already added before it reaches the consumer, there is little opportunity to make changes on an individual basis other than limiting one’s choices to fresh items like produce. This would also exclude many options in restaurants.

“Individuals can’t make this choice easily,” said Dr. Kirstin Bibbins-Domingo, professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), to ABC News. “So maybe we should find ways to work with the food industry,” she suggested.

The National Salt Reduction Initiative, a partnership started by the New York City Health Department that has expanded to nearly 100 city and state health organizations across the country, has been trying to get food manufacturers and restaurant operators to cut salt by 25 percent or more since 2008, the year of the organization’s inception. The current goal is to achieve a reduction of 20 percent by 2014.

Critics say that such measures are impractical and would make little difference. Public health advocates have been focusing on hypertension as if no other health threats existed, said Morton Satin, Vice President of science and research at the Salt Institute, a trade association for the salt industry, in response to the recent studies to ABC News. The association warns that low salt intake could produce its own set of health problems, especially for the elderly.

While most experts would agree that multiple factors can be responsible for the development of high blood pressure, including genetic predisposition, gender, age and other non-modifiable components, poor diet and lifestyle choices, which are modifiable and therefore preventable risk factors, usually play a much greater role. In a milestone conference on the connections between sodium intake and blood pressure, sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the participating scientists concluded that “an abundance of scientific evidence indicates that higher sodium consumption is associated with higher levels of blood pressure, [as demonstrated in] animal studies, observational epidemiologic studies, and clinical studies and trials.” They were also hopeful that more effective strategies could be developed to improve diet and lifestyles patterns that benefit the larger population.

If you liked this article, you may also enjoy reading: “Too Much Salt in Our Food Creates Serious Health Hazards.”

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog and at amazon.com.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (www.timigustafson.com). You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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So It Is Possible to Reduce Salt in Our Food

April 17th, 2012 at 5:46 pm by timigustafson

The salt content of popular fast food items like chicken nuggets can vary considerably, depending where you buy them, according to a study report by an international group of scientists that tested products of leading multinational restaurant chains. What they found were dramatic differences in the amounts of added salt in the same kinds of food, made by the same companies, only in different parts of the world.

For the study, researchers from Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States analyzed fast food items from McDonald’s, Burger King, KFC, Domino’s Pizza, Pizza Hut and Subway in each of their respective countries and compared notes.

Although fast food is known for being notoriously high in salt wherever you go, the study results are nevertheless startling. The U.S. and Canada were reported to have the highest levels of salt compared to other countries – in some cases nearly twice as high.

One reason for the differences could be government guidelines for salt reduction like in the U.K., said Dr. Norman Campbell of the University of Calgary, Canada, one of the authors of the study report. The British government has set voluntary targets for the food industry, although not yet for fast food restaurants. Still, a growing number of food manufacturers and restaurant operators have committed themselves to meeting the proposed levels as soon as possible and are already using their pledges for advertising purposes.

What this study shows is that reducing salt in our food is indeed feasible and that the technology to do so exists despite of the food industry’s long-standing assertions to the contrary. If it can be done in one country by the same manufacturers and with virtually identical items, it can be repeated elsewhere and certainly here in the U.S.

“Consumers should not have to bear all the responsibility for their diet choices,” said Dr. Campbell. 80 percent of most people’s daily salt intake doesn’t come from the saltshaker on the dining room table but is already added to many processed foods, including items that don’t even taste salty.

The best strategy for reducing salt consumption is for governments to intervene and regulate the use of salt in food processing, he said. All other attempts have been proven unsuccessful. Education campaigns like the National Salt Reduction Initiative here in the U.S. may be well-intended, but they can only work if supported by binding regulations for the food industry.

Dr. Campbell doesn’t believe that trying to further educate the public will produce better outcomes. “We have a highly educated population that is aware of the issues. They are trying to eat healthy and a lot of them perceive they are eating healthy.” What persists is widespread confusion because people don’t know how ubiquitous salt is in their food supply. They eat their food as it’s presented to them, trusting that – although it may not always be perfectly healthy – it will do them no harm.

Another frequently made argument by food manufacturers is that Americans love salty foods and would not buy them if they had a bland taste. “That is because they are used to higher salt levels,” said Dr. David Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University. In other words, it’s an acquired, not a natural taste.

According to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine, it is estimated that cutting back just 3 grams of salt (1,200 mg sodium) a day could save the lives of almost 100,000 Americans annually. If the industry substantially reduced the levels of salt it currently uses for food processing, it could translate to large gains for the health of the population, wrote the researchers in their concluding summary. How much longer do we have to wait?

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a clinical dietitian and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (http://www.timigustafson.com), and at amazon.com. You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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Too Much Salt in Our Bread, U.S. Government Study Finds

February 12th, 2012 at 3:35 pm by timigustafson

The highest amount of salt Americans eat comes from bread, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nearly 50 percent of the salt consumed in the U.S. is linked to popular foods such as baked goods, cold cuts, cured meats, pizza, poultry, soups, sandwiches, cheese, pasta and snacks like pretzels and potato chips. Many items loaded with salt don’t even taste salty.

The study, which involved over 7,000 participants, found that bread accounted for an average of seven percent of daily sodium intake, more than any other individual food item. Bread may not contain the highest amount of salt per serving, but the fact that people eat it more often and in larger quantities than most other foods makes it a leading contributor to high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.

The average American consumes about 3,250 milligrams of salt per day, far more than what’s recommended by the government’s Dietary Guidelines, which is 2,300 milligrams for healthy adults and 1,500 milligrams for high blood pressure and heart disease patients. Over 30 percent of the adult population suffer from high blood pressure, according to the CDC.

Most consumers are not aware that they are getting too much salt. What makes matters worse is that they could not easily change that even if they wanted to. “Most sodium comes from common grocery store and restaurant items and only a very small portion from the shaker at the table,” Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, the Director of the CDC, told reporters. “People can choose how much salt they add to their food at the table,” he said, “but they can’t take it out once it’s there.”

In fact, over 60 percent of the salt consumed by Americans is found in processed foods, about 25 percent in restaurant meals and the remainder from other sources such as vending machines and extra salt added at home, according to CDC statistics.

Dr. Frieden called for food manufacturers and restaurant owners to reduce the amount of salt they apply to their products. It is estimated that a 25 percent reduction in salt content in the most popular food items could save tens of thousands of lives every year.

Food industry representatives have responded by saying that reducing sodium would adversely affect taste and may also violate food safety standards because salt is commonly used as a preservative.

The CDC study report was released in the February edition of the journal “Vital Signs,” just in time to coincide with “Heart Health Month.” Sodium is well known to raise blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from these diseases.

Health experts have long advised that people with heart problems should avoid processed and packaged foods as much as possible and eat more fresh produce instead. With regards to bread, it is important to read the Nutrition Facts labels. Sodium content in different breads can considerably vary between 80 and well over 200 milligrams. Other items like canned soups can have a wide sodium range from 100 to well over 900 milligrams, depending on the brand. Many fast food choices and TV dinners contain astronomical amounts of salt, often more than the recommended daily values in just one serving.

Asking food manufacturers and restaurants to voluntarily change the ways they use salt has not been very effective, although there are exceptions. Other than through legislation, the only promising approach would be consumer demand. If grocery store owners found that customers prefer low-sodium products and restaurant patrons asked to have salt reduced or eliminated in their dishes, we could see some positive changes over time.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a clinical dietitian and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (http://www.timigustafson.com), and at amazon.com. You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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About timigustafson

About Timi Gustafson, R.D. As a clinical dietitian, health counselor, book author, syndicated newspaper columnist and, as of late, blogger, she has been able to reach millions of people, addressing their concerns about issues of health, lifestyle and nutrition. As Co-founder and Director of Nutrition Services for Cyberdiet.com (now Mediconsult.com), she created the first nutrition-related interactive website on the Internet in 1995. Many of the features you find on her blog, www.timigustafson.com, are based on the pioneering work of those days. Today, her goals remain the same: Helping people to achieve optimal health of body and mind. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics from San José State University in California and completed a Clinical Dietetic Internship at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco. She is a registered dietitian and Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, an active member of the Washington State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, a member of the Diabetes Care and Education, Dietitians in Business and Communications, Healthy Aging, Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition, and the Vegetarian Nutrition Practice Groups. For more information about Timi Gustafson R.D. please visit: www.timigustafson.com

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