Posts Tagged ‘Seniors’

Why Seniors Should Not Neglect Their Looks

September 16th, 2016 at 2:41 pm by timigustafson

Whenever I’m invited to talk or write about healthy aging – which also for personal reasons has become a specialty of mine – I’m usually expected to address issues of physical and mental fitness. These are certainly more pressing as we grow older, but they should not be the only concerns to consider.

Life in our senior years is as complex as at any other time. We continue to have goals to pursue and routines to maintain, although they may seem different now, and perhaps unfold at a slower pace. And while loss of abilities is a natural part of aging, we don’t have to hasten the process by being negligent. This includes every part of our existence, not the least the way we look and present ourselves to the outside world. Yes, I’m talking about such ‘frivolous’ things as fashion and style.

One of the unfortunate but inevitable effects of aging – for both men and women – is that personal care like grooming and makeup seems to require longer and greater efforts. But it remains as important as ever, and so does getting properly and tastefully dressed.

Granted, most fashion designers don’t have a mature clientele in mind when they create their collections, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t keep looking for new ideas and trends. Much of what you find in stores today is not that unheard of and is routinely inspired by periods we went through years or even decades ago. And then, who cares, as long as it makes us look and feel good.

But here is the thing: For many people, the ability to critically judge their appearance does indeed diminish with age. There are no obvious reasons for that. Perhaps they just stop caring or get too comfortable with what they have.

For instance, many seniors have a tendency to hold on to the things they own, including their clothing. It can be hard to toss out an overcoat or suit that once may have cost a lot of money and is still in perfect condition – but is now hopelessly out of style. Or, due to age-related loss of muscle mass and spine compaction, it no longer fits properly.

Especially older men tend to wear their clothes for too long. Eventually, their wardrobe becomes almost demeaning to them, with ill-fitting, rumpled and sagging jackets and pants.

Women make the same mistake if they keep dresses and costumes forever in their closets for those special occasions that rarely ever happen anymore. No ladies, those nineteen-eighties oversized shoulder pads won’t make you look as powerful as they used to. In any case, you don’t do yourself a favor by hanging on to that beloved old thing. Get rid of it.

Finding good color combinations is another issue. Lessening eyesight can be a problem when picking out fabrics both in coloring and texture. Of course, what goes with what is never written in stone, and arrangements that were once looked upon as no-nos have turned into must-haves later on.

But some rules usually apply one way or another. What they are at any given time is not always easily discernible, especially for those of us who don’t stay up-to-date. So, it’s worthwhile to look around stores every so often, even if you can’t find anything right away that calls your name.

There is also no shame in asking for advice. If sales personnel are not helpful, you can bring along a (perhaps younger) friend or family member who has some knowledge and interest to make you look your best.

There is also myriad information available on the Internet, and not only for seniors. After all, we are not that much different from the rest of the population, just because we have been around the block a few more times.

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Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.

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For Healthy Aging, Stay in Control

May 17th, 2016 at 2:58 pm by timigustafson

In his latest book, Charles Duhigg, the author of bestsellers like “The Power of Habit, Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business,” and now, “Smarter, Faster, Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business,” describes how a group of seniors changed the daily routines they were supposed to follow in an assisted living facility. They ‘rebelled,’ if you will, against a regimen that was forced upon them – not violently, of course, but in subversive ways nevertheless.

For instance, they would trade food items from their pre-set lunch trays among themselves according to their individual tastes and preferences. That may seem insignificant, but still, it gave them a sense of control they wouldn’t have had by eating everything that was put in front of them.

Even more rewarding was the idea that they could rearrange the furniture in their cookie-cutter-style rooms to give them a more personal flair. When those actions were met with resistance from management, those rebellious spirits had ever more fun in doing as they pleased.

But getting a brief moment of satisfaction from some random acts of defiance wasn’t the point of this story. The consequences were much more profound. As it turned out, experiencing a bit more control over their lives did the health and well-being of these people enormously good. They ate better, were more physically active, improved their mental capacities, and had overall fewer health problems – just because of a little boost in self-confidence and determination. In other words, for these folks, control seemed to be a crucial element for healthy aging.

Being able to make decisions for themselves signals people that they are still alive and that their lives still have meaning, Duhigg writes. Even deciding to stage a nursing home insurrection can become proof that someone is alive and can assert authority over his or her actions.

The changes that typically take place after retirement and as the natural aging process progresses are monumental, to put it mildly, says Dave Bernard, a California-based blogger who specializes in issues around retirement and aging.

When people stop working after decades of employment or in business, they exit abruptly from the world they knew. In many ways, they lose their identity, which they must regain in some other fashion, and they must reorient themselves. At the same time, they find themselves more isolated and have to rely on their own devices as they plan their days, organize their financial affairs, or try to take care of their health needs. They also gradually undergo physical and mental changes that don’t work in their favor. As they get more fragile and vulnerable to health problems, they become increasingly dependent on others, something seniors dread the most among all effects of aging.

Loss of independence can happen suddenly through a catastrophic event or insidiously through natural decline. But most seniors don’t prepare well for either. They believe they can stay in their home indefinitely and take care of themselves, even if that means to struggle on their own. But the vast majority does eventually end up requiring some help with daily chores like cooking, cleaning, shopping, or simply getting out of the house.

Thankfully, there is assistance available that enables people to have both, remaining reasonably independent and being cared for to the extent it is needed. Organizations like the National Aging in Place Council and countless other programs try to enable their clientele to continue the lifestyle they are used to and also get support like adult day care services, home remodeling, or financial advice.

Of course, the quality of life at old age depends largely on the personal choices an individual makes. The best care is to take proactive steps towards health aging. And for this, it is never too early and never too late.

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Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.

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Lifestyle-Related Ills Tend to Multiply with Age, Study Finds

April 24th, 2013 at 7:13 am by timigustafson

Seniors who suffer from chronic health conditions like high blood pressure or heart disease often develop a host of other, seemingly unrelated health problems, including cognitive impairment like memory loss and dementia, according to a new study based on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the medical records of hundreds of thousands of seniors residing in assisted-living facilities and found that most had at least one chronic health condition. What was more alarming, however, was that many had overlapping ailments. While high blood pressure and heart disease were most common, nearly half of the assisted-living residents showed signs of dementia.

“These findings suggest a vulnerable population with a high burden of functional and cognitive impairment,” the authors of the study report wrote.

Many studies have suggested a link between vascular disease and dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s, said Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy, a professor for psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University’s Institute for Brain Sciences (DIBS). Therefore it may not be possible to treat dementia without treating vascular problems, he added.

But that may be easier said than done. “We don’t universally do a great job of how we treat conditions that overlap, for example Alzheimer’s and high blood pressure,” said Dr. Cythia M. Boyd, an associate professor of geriatric medicine at the John Hopkins University Center on Aging and Health, to the New York Times. “Much of the way we practice medicine is looking at disease by disease. We aren’t doing enough thinking about how to add them together and really integrate care.”

What makes things more complicated is that most doctors are not sufficiently trained in preventing or reducing lifestyle-related illnesses – not in the general public and certainly not in older patients – other than through medicating. For instance, the importance of nutrition as a part of preventive care is rarely ever mentioned in medical schools. The approximate time devoted to nutrition science over the first two years of medical education is six hours, which is clearly inadequate, according to the National Academy of Sciences. The same goes for other health-promoting measures such as exercise, especially for the aging population.

Yet many studies have provided compelling evidence that diet and exercise play a significant role for physical and mental health at any time in life but increasingly so as we age.

For example, a more recent study from Britain concluded that the so-called “Western diet,” which typically includes fried, sweet and processed foods, red meat, refined grains and high-fat dairy products, increases the risk of chronic diseases, which in turn can adversely affect both physical and mental health in later years. Eating a Western diet makes it less likely to have an ideal aging process, says Dr. Tasnime Akbaraly, a researcher at the University College of London and lead author of the study report. Conversely, making dietary improvements can yield multiple benefits in this regard.

There is also further evidence that exercise can give a boost to the aging brain. Scientists at the University of British Columbia found that older women who suffered from mild cognitive impairment could improve their memory through weight training and brisk walking.

The connections between physical and mental decline may not yet be completely understood, but it seems clear that chronic diseases play a major role in the process. While these are widespread, the encouraging news is that many, if not all, are preventable by healthier lifestyle choices.

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Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog and at amazon.com.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (www.timigustafson.com).

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Hollywood has decided to invest once more in a movie specifically aimed at baby boomers. After the considerable successes of “Something’s Gotta Give” (2003), “The Bucket List” (2007), and this year’s long-running box office hit, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Hope Springs,” now in theaters, addresses another topic that is very much of concern for this aging generation: How does one maintain a decades-old marriage, including a decent sex life, when mutual attraction can no longer be taken for granted?

For those who haven’t seen the movie (yet), here’s a brief synopsis: Like many empty-nesters, Kay (Meryl Streep) and Arnold (Tommy Lee Jones) have settled into a comfortable but mind-numbing, soul-destroying routine. He goes to work every morning as an accountant, albeit with retirement plans not far off. She takes care of the house and earns a little extra money from a part-time job in a clothing store. While he’s resigned to the status quo, she wants more, in fact, she wants a different life that includes a loving relationship and – if it’s not too much to ask – a little action in the bedroom. Seeking the help of a marriage counselor seems the only way to salvage whatever is left of their former bliss.

Obviously, the film’s message stands in stark contrast to the “Fifty Shades” book series by E. L. James, often dubbed as ‘mommy porn,’ where women of all ages can find inspiration for their erotic endeavors in and outside of marriage. By comparison, “Hope Springs” is almost a turnoff, considering the long-term prospects.

In any case, talking (let alone making a film) about intimacy between older people has never been easy in our youth-oriented culture. This may be changing now in response to demographic shifts. But timeliness alone will not guarantee that a truly meaningful conversation can take place.

The way we deal with the subject of sex at the later stages in life is almost exclusively focused on issues like erectile dysfunction and other unfortunate effects of the natural aging process. Performance-enhancing drugs like Viagra and Cialis may sell better than almost any other pharmaceutical product on the planet, but in terms of treatment they offer a purely mechanical solution: As long as the plumbing keeps working, everything’s supposed to be fine. What they can’t do is to help preserve a satisfying relationship with a partner who has seemingly been around forever and offers little hope for many more surprises. Even if the desired effect kicks in every time, the ability to perform in bed is not the same as making love.

Like many couples whose marriage has come to a crossroad, Kay and Arnold take stock of all their unmet needs and expectations. Being sexually unfulfilled, although initially high on the list of their mutual misgivings, turns out only to be a symptom of a far deeper disconnect. Soon they have to realize that the deterioration of their relationship is not caused by a poor sex life, but rather the other way around. There is no love to express because there is no love to be had. Instead, an empty space is widening between them – symbolized by separate schedules, separate interests, separate bedrooms – and by the time they can no longer ignore it, they are unable to bridge it.

It is a strength of the movie to show how a ‘Me First’ attitude, common among but not limited to baby boomers, leaves us terribly unequipped to deal with these kinds of problems. Bookstores and websites overflow with professional guidance and self-help materials, but divorce rates remain high and more people are now single than married. The filmmakers were too smart to try giving any definite answers themselves. One thing, however, becomes clear: Love is still a matter of giving over taking, creation over expectation, dialogue over demand. In a way, we are warned not to expect too much and yet make the most of what we have. Not bad advice from a simple boomer flick.

If you enjoyed this article, you may also be interested in “The Secret of Healthy Aging.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a clinical dietitian and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (http://www.timigustafson.com), and at amazon.com. You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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Gourmet Dining on a Slowing Metabolism

January 18th, 2012 at 2:43 pm by timigustafson

Today’s retirees have many more options how to spend their golden years than any generation before them. Baby boomers, especially those who are well off, can satisfy their curiosity and adventurous spirit by exploring new business endeavors, continuing their education or traveling around the world. Some discover new passions and acquire new skills they never had time for while working.

One of those late pursuits that is rapidly gaining in popularity is gourmet dining, both at home and at restaurants. Interest in advanced cooking classes has never been greater, not to mention the high ratings for food shows and competitions between celebrity chefs on TV. The auditoria of culinary institutes around the world are filled with students in their sixties, seventies and beyond, eager to familiarize themselves with the latest trends and techniques in the world of haute cuisine.

Fine wining and dining has always been a prerogative of those who like (and can afford) to indulge in the better things life has to offer, but today it’s a whole different ballgame. In an article for the New York Times (12/28/2011), Charles Isherwood, a food writer, describes his parents (both retired) as “foodies” for whom eating well has become their lives’ mission. “My parents practically live to eat,” he writes. “At home [they] eat out three or so times a week. But when they come to New York, we sample the city’s restaurants in five-day, two-big-meals-a-day binges that have become something of a legend.”

Of course, besides being tremendously pleasurable, fine dining also conveys an aura of culture and sophistication (not to mention exclusiveness due to oftentimes ridiculous pricing). However, many food lovers also seem to think that eating at the best restaurants or cooking with the most expensive ingredients automatically means their diet is healthy. But this is not necessarily true.

Gourmet chefs typically focus on taste and presentation. Calorie counts and fat contents are not their primary concern. The individual portions may look small compared to lower-end eateries with their “all-you-can-eat” value offers, but if you order three, four or more courses, you end up with a similarly large amount of food in your stomach.

You may say, well, it’s only on rare occasions that you go all out like that. But what about eating out three times a day when you travel? What about a cruise where limitless access to great food is one of the perks?

The unfortunate truth is that as you get older and have more time and funds to indulge a little more than you used to, your metabolism begins to slow down. In fact, it slows down about 5% to 10% every decade or so, beginning in your mid-twenties. This means that the typical American loses between 20% and 40% of metabolic power over the course of his or her lifespan, according to Dr. John Berardi, best-selling author of “The Metabolism Advantage.”

The reasons are easy to understand: Your metabolism converts calories into energy. When your calorie intake is higher than your energy expenditure, weight gain occurs. As you grow older, it becomes harder to maintain a healthy calorie-energy balance because your lifestyle probably becomes more sedentary and your physical activities get less strenuous. Another result is age-related muscle loss. Diminishing muscle mass means that fewer calories are being burned off and your metabolism slows down. While this is an inevitable, natural process, there are things you can do to prevent it from happening too fast.

The best way to counteract muscle loss is weight training. Lifting weights does not only add muscle, it also burns off calories even while you rest afterwards. Doing aerobics, of course, also helps with calorie burn. People who are said to have a faster metabolism are probably just more physically active all day.

Not surprisingly, adherence to healthy eating habits also matters more with age. Your calorie requirements may go down, but your need for high-quality nutrients remains the same throughout your life. Simple but nutrient-dense foods are the best choices for a healthy, age-appropriate diet – such as fresh fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants, whole grains, fish, lean meats and low-fat dairy products.

So, before you try out your next culinary sensation downtown or at home, keep in mind that your health is too important to throw all caution to the wind, just because you can.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a clinical dietitian and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (http://www.timigustafson.com), and at amazon.com. You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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About timigustafson

Timi Gustafson, RD, LDN, FAND is a registered dietitian, health counselor, book author, syndicated newspaper columnist and blogger. She lectures on nutrition and healthy living to audiences worldwide. She is the founder and president of Solstice Publications LLC, a publishing company specializing in health and lifestyle education. Timi completed her Clinical Dietetic Internship at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, an active member of the Washington State Dietetic Association, a member of the Diabetes Care and Education, Healthy Aging, Vegetarian Nutrition and the Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition practice groups. For more information, please visit http://www.timigustafson.com

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