Posts Tagged ‘Pre-diabetes’

Lack of Awareness Heightens Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

July 4th, 2015 at 4:58 pm by timigustafson

Only about 10 percent of people who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes know about their condition, which makes it hard to take proactive measures while there is still time to prevent the full-blown disease, according to a new study.

Lack of awareness keeps a vast part of the population with elevated blood sugar that is not yet diabetic but can lead to worsening outcomes from making important lifestyle changes, such as cutting back on sodas and sugary foods as well as losing weight and getting more exercise, says Dr. Anjali Gopalan of the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, the lead author of the study.

“People with pre-diabetes who lose a modest amount of weight and increase their physical activity are less likely to develop diabetes. Our study importantly shows that individuals with pre-diabetes who were aware of this diagnosis were more likely to engage in some of these effective and recommended healthy lifestyle changes,” she told Reuters.

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has dramatically increased in recent years and is estimated by the World Health Organization (WHO) to affect now about 9 percent of the adult world population. It has become the seventh leading cause of death.

Once considered a disease of older adults, it is fast spreading among children and adolescents, primarily in the developed parts of the world like North America and Europe, but also increasingly elsewhere.

Pre-diabetes is considered a precursor to diabetes, a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas does not produce sufficient amounts of insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it is provided with. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or elevated blood sugar, is a common result of uncontrolled diabetes that can lead to irreversible harm, including to the nerves and blood vessels.

Although the causes of pre-diabetes and diabetes are well known, there is still much confusion and myth creation among the public that make it difficult to separate fact from fiction.

It is important to understand that diabetes comes mainly in two forms: type 1, which is caused by genetics and perhaps some other factors that are not yet fully understood; and type 2 diabetes, where genetic makeup can also play a role, but which is more often connected to diet and lifestyle.

The latter can usually be prevented or at least controlled through weight management, healthy eating and regular exercise as well as medication where necessary.

Unfortunately, pre-diabetes has no specific signs or symptoms, which makes timely detection so much harder. However, increased thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, and problems with vision can be red flags and should be brought to a doctor’s attention.

Experts recommend that especially people who are overweight, have a family history of type 2 diabetes, suffer from high blood pressure and/or high cholesterol, are over the age of 45, or belong to certain ethnic groups should be tested for pre-diabetes as part of their regular physical, regardless of symptoms.

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Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog and at  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (


Obesity and Diabetes – The Plague of Our Time

February 28th, 2012 at 6:00 pm by timigustafson

When Michelle Obama announced “Let’s Move,” her signature initiative to combat childhood obesity, she emphasized that major diet and lifestyle changes were not required in her view to turn this growing health crisis around. “Small changes add up,” she said. “We don’t need to totally evaporate our way of being as we know it today.” In other words, if we just cut a few calories here and there and exercise a bit more, things will be fine before long. A comforting thought.

But that may be wishful thinking, according to Mark Hyman, MD, chairman of the Institute for Functional Medicine and medical director of the UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts, and author of several bestselling health books, including his latest, titled “The Blood Sugar Solution.” The way he sees it, we are in the middle of an explosive epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes that will touch almost everyone in one way or another. He does not hesitate to call it “the modern plague.”

Obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dementia and cancer are ultimately all rooted in one and the same problem: Our dismal diet- and lifestyle choices. Diagnosing and treating these diseases separately as if they were not interconnected misses the whole picture. Instead, Dr. Hyman proposes using a more comprehensive term to describe the continuum of which all these health problems are part of: “Diabesity.”

Diabesity can range from slight weight problems and mild insulin resistance to morbid obesity and severe diabetes. Because the disease is not well understood as a continuum, millions of those affected by it remain undiagnosed and untreated. As a consequence, more people all over the world die now from chronic illnesses than from infectious diseases. The real tragedy is that the causes are almost always environmental and lifestyle-related, which would make them perfectly preventable or curable through public education and enough political will to implement the necessary changes.

“This is a lifestyle and environmental disease and won’t be cured by medications,” Dr. Hyman writes. “Billions and billions have been wasted trying to find the ‘drug cure,’ while the solution lies right under our nose. Shouldn’t the main question we ask be why is this happening? Instead of what new drug can we find to treat it?

Since most of our modern-day ailments are primarily caused by poor diet choices, chronic stress and sedentary lifestyles, as well as toxins and allergens in the environment, we must address these problems from the ground up (literally). Instead of looking for quick fixes through medication and surgical procedures, we can make many important corrections by ourselves and without delay by using the right ingredients that make us healthy again, including whole, fresh food, vitamins and minerals, water, fresh air, exercise, stress reduction, etc. “When we take out the bad stuff and put in the good stuff, the body knows what to do and creates health and disease goes away,” writes Dr. Hyman. Care for the environment is part of that, too. Here, he strongly agrees with Sir Albert Howard, who is by many considered the founder of the organic agriculture movement, when he wrote in his landmark book, “The Soil and Health,” that we must “treat the whole problem of health in soil, plant, animal and man as one great subject.”

Finding our way back to wholesome nutrition is one of the greatest challenges we face today. “In America, we eat more than we ever have, yet we are nutritionally depleted,” writes Dr. Hyman. The epidemic of diabesity and other chronic illnesses is paralleled by an epidemic of nutritional deficiencies. Most of us don’t eat enough the kind of food that protects us from diseases and too much of the kind that makes us sick.

“Food literally speaks to our genes,” he writes in a chapter titled “Nutrigenomics.” “The information your body receives from the foods you eat turns your genes on and off.” Whole-foods and plant-based diets have been shown in clinical studies to be able to turn off cancer-causing genes or turn on cancer-protective genes. No medication can do this. “What you put on your fork is the most powerful medicine you can take to correct the root causes of chronic disease and diabesity,” he writes.

“The Blood Sugar Solution” is a highly informative but, thankfully, also a very accessible book for both professionals and the laypersons. Some readers may find Dr. Hyman’s positions to be somewhat radical, if not utopian, especially where he seeks to offer hands-on solutions. Admittedly, he writes with passion and a sense of urgency – and rightly so. The obesity crisis keeps growing unabatedly worldwide and the time for “small steps” may have passed. Something has to change on a fundamental level. Unfortunately, that makes it so much less likely that we will see significant successes in the near future, if ever.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a clinical dietitian and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.” (, and at You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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About timigustafson

Timi Gustafson, RD, LDN, FAND is a registered dietitian, health counselor, book author, syndicated newspaper columnist and blogger. She lectures on nutrition and healthy living to audiences worldwide. She is the founder and president of Solstice Publications LLC, a publishing company specializing in health and lifestyle education. Timi completed her Clinical Dietetic Internship at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, an active member of the Washington State Dietetic Association, a member of the Diabetes Care and Education, Healthy Aging, Vegetarian Nutrition and the Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition practice groups. For more information, please visit

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