Posts Tagged ‘Hygiene’

Why Seniors Should Not Neglect Their Looks

September 16th, 2016 at 2:41 pm by timigustafson

Whenever I’m invited to talk or write about healthy aging – which also for personal reasons has become a specialty of mine – I’m usually expected to address issues of physical and mental fitness. These are certainly more pressing as we grow older, but they should not be the only concerns to consider.

Life in our senior years is as complex as at any other time. We continue to have goals to pursue and routines to maintain, although they may seem different now, and perhaps unfold at a slower pace. And while loss of abilities is a natural part of aging, we don’t have to hasten the process by being negligent. This includes every part of our existence, not the least the way we look and present ourselves to the outside world. Yes, I’m talking about such ‘frivolous’ things as fashion and style.

One of the unfortunate but inevitable effects of aging – for both men and women – is that personal care like grooming and makeup seems to require longer and greater efforts. But it remains as important as ever, and so does getting properly and tastefully dressed.

Granted, most fashion designers don’t have a mature clientele in mind when they create their collections, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t keep looking for new ideas and trends. Much of what you find in stores today is not that unheard of and is routinely inspired by periods we went through years or even decades ago. And then, who cares, as long as it makes us look and feel good.

But here is the thing: For many people, the ability to critically judge their appearance does indeed diminish with age. There are no obvious reasons for that. Perhaps they just stop caring or get too comfortable with what they have.

For instance, many seniors have a tendency to hold on to the things they own, including their clothing. It can be hard to toss out an overcoat or suit that once may have cost a lot of money and is still in perfect condition – but is now hopelessly out of style. Or, due to age-related loss of muscle mass and spine compaction, it no longer fits properly.

Especially older men tend to wear their clothes for too long. Eventually, their wardrobe becomes almost demeaning to them, with ill-fitting, rumpled and sagging jackets and pants.

Women make the same mistake if they keep dresses and costumes forever in their closets for those special occasions that rarely ever happen anymore. No ladies, those nineteen-eighties oversized shoulder pads won’t make you look as powerful as they used to. In any case, you don’t do yourself a favor by hanging on to that beloved old thing. Get rid of it.

Finding good color combinations is another issue. Lessening eyesight can be a problem when picking out fabrics both in coloring and texture. Of course, what goes with what is never written in stone, and arrangements that were once looked upon as no-nos have turned into must-haves later on.

But some rules usually apply one way or another. What they are at any given time is not always easily discernible, especially for those of us who don’t stay up-to-date. So, it’s worthwhile to look around stores every so often, even if you can’t find anything right away that calls your name.

There is also no shame in asking for advice. If sales personnel are not helpful, you can bring along a (perhaps younger) friend or family member who has some knowledge and interest to make you look your best.

There is also myriad information available on the Internet, and not only for seniors. After all, we are not that much different from the rest of the population, just because we have been around the block a few more times.

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Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.


Navigating the Flu Season

December 1st, 2012 at 6:36 pm by timigustafson

While most of us are out and about doing our gift shopping, attending parties, going on vacations or visiting loved ones, we are also increasingly at risk of falling prey to the countless health hazards we encounter in public places – most commonly a cold or the flu. Against widespread opinion, foul weather and cold temperatures have little to do with our heightened chances of catching something this time of the year. It’s rather our being in crowded places like shopping malls, restaurants and airports that causes our undoing.

The flu season starts in October and lasts through April, which happens to coincide with the school year rather than changes in temperature, said Dr. Jon Abramson, a specialist in infectious disease at Wake Forest Baptist Health, North Carolina, in an interview with ABC News/Health. He points to studies that have shown how the flu spreads mostly from school-age children who are in close physical contact with one another and who subsequently pass it on to adults. That can happen in any climate zone, including where it’s warm all year round.

That’s also one of the reasons why shopping malls rank among the germiest public places anywhere. It’s not just the restrooms you should be weary of, it’s also the food court tables, door handles, escalator handrails, checkout counters – and especially toys. “All those sniffling tots inside toy stores […] who just like to put everything in their mouths, can leave invisible coatings of germs behind – not to mention what they spew into the air when they sneeze or cough,” said Jane E. Allen, a health writer for ABC.

Of course, adults disseminate bacteria and viruses just as much. “The great hazard is being that close to so many people and being in everyone’s breathing space,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, to ABC. He recommends washing hands often and especially before touching food. “We live in a world that’s not sterile, but what we’d like to do is to be hygienic,” he added. Better than using soap from dispensers in public bathroom are hand sanitizers you can carry with you.

Getting vaccinated against the flu and other contagious diseases such as whooping cough is certainly advisable, although there is no guarantee that you will escape the entire flu season unscathed. Studies found that flu shots are effective only about 60 percent of the time, but are still considered the best defense we have available today. The reason for the mixed success rate is that there are literally hundreds of strains of the flu virus. Vaccines offered to the public are geared towards the most common types that are in seasonal circulation. And those change constantly, making a catch-all approach impossible. Also, even after vaccination, the body needs some time to build-up enough antibodies to fend off infections, which can take several weeks. Sometimes, it can then already be too late.

Besides frequent hand washing, health experts also recommend adherence to a highly nutritious diet, exercise and sufficient amounts of sleep to strengthen the immune system. It is also important not to get too paranoid in our efforts to stay healthy. Ultimately, we can only do so much to protect ourselves and stay functional at the same time.

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy reading “Surviving the Travel Season

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book “The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun”®, which is available on her blog, “Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D.”, and at You can follow Timi on Twitter and on Facebook.

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About timigustafson

Timi Gustafson, RD, LDN, FAND is a registered dietitian, health counselor, book author, syndicated newspaper columnist and blogger. She lectures on nutrition and healthy living to audiences worldwide. She is the founder and president of Solstice Publications LLC, a publishing company specializing in health and lifestyle education. Timi completed her Clinical Dietetic Internship at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, an active member of the Washington State Dietetic Association, a member of the Diabetes Care and Education, Healthy Aging, Vegetarian Nutrition and the Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutrition practice groups. For more information, please visit

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